The Importance of Graphic Design to Your Business

While a number of small business owners know why great design is so valuable, some do not realize this. Even if you are a newbie or veteran in business, this list can be beneficial.

Sadly, smaller businesses don’t give importance to professional design work. In fact, when they go through financial issues, they cut down on the creative budget, which is but natural. The resources of many small businesses are limited, and though they like a professional looking website and logo, as well as credible marketing collateral, they are not ready to pay the required professional fees.

They would rather hire poorly trained person like a marketing assistant to create a DIY design. Or else, they would search online for affordable options. Whoever they choose will most likely make them disappointed with the outcome.

Therefore, when the time comes that you feel skeptical about spending for great graphic design, keep these six things in mind:

First impressions last.

Remember that you could either make it or break it with a first impression. No matter if it is your site or logo, potential clients can immediately judge a business in a matter of seconds depending on visual appeal on its own. A graphic design with high quality makes your business more credible, making it priceless. Even if you have exceptional products/services, if your site is poorly designed, it is less likely for visitors to stay long on your site or engage any further.

Branding lets your company be easily remembered.

Solid graphic design lets your branding be consistent in all visual aspects of your business. When you hire a professional graphic design artist, he will make sure that all colors, fonts plus images are accurate. For this reason, when visitors land on your site, they will experience the same thing as reading your business brochure. In a way, it is sort of alliteration, wherein your business becomes easy to recognize and remember. In addition, consistency boosts professionalism.

Creativity can make a difference.

One of the things that all businesses have in common is competition. To give them an edge over their competitors, they have to be competitive when it comes to quality, price, customer service and even offer something different. Creativity has the ability to let a business stand above the rest of competition.

The visual communication plan of a company has many purposes, one of which is making your business unique.

A good design has the ability to convert.

It is nice to have a beautiful website. It is even better to have a visual appealing website that makes income. Design is not only about creating something beautiful. It should be effective in capturing and encouraging visitors. A properly designed website can persuade visitors to take action such as clicking “buy”. When a brochure is well-crafted, it persuades viewers to turn the pages. A professional graphic design is capable of delivering measurable outcome for small businesses.

Investing more can eventually save time and money.

Businesses that do not take graphic design seriously right from the start will most likely experience a design overhaul sooner or later. This can even happen once or more. Quality design lasts for a long time. Investing in professional graphic design is just like spending many times on inferior design. Furthermore, changing the image of your business wastes time and could hurt your brand.

5 Tips for Typography Best Practices

This was my first year at Typographics 2018. Typographics 2018 is a conference for typography enthusiasts around the world, that’s held at Cooper Union. There were panelists from San Francisco, Berlin, Buenos Aires, and Japan; it really felt like a truly international experience.

I had the chance to sit in on both the conference and TypeLab parts of Typographics. Here are a few highlights from the panels/breakout sessions that I really enjoyed:

1. Emojis = Pictures + Character (Jennifer Daniel, Google Emoji)
Emojis are images that may translate into different meanings across different devices. Jennifer gave an example about how the “dumpling” emoji looks different across different chat platforms -every culture has a dumpling!
I found an interesting tension in this statement -emojis should have a consistent user experience (across platforms), yet still be personalized to their users.

2. Ubiquitous type is can cause user confusion (Mr. Keedy)
Mr. Keedy created Keedy Sans, a popular font in the 90’s. The font was considered “uncool” 10 years later and used everywhere. Keedy sans is used on teenage girl makeup packaging, as well as winebars. This could create a bad user experience for people because of lack of branding. Last year, Mr. Keedy refreshed his font -to create greater customization and allow Keedy fans to layer the font for interesting visual effects.

3. Braille is a form of typography (Ellen Lupton, Cooper Hewitt)
Ellen talked about how blind individuals read Braille in a unique way -holding it across their body. She also demonstrated a blind person’s experience watching music videos by showing the accessibility voiceover.

4. Brand holds content together with design (Gale Bichler, NYTimes)
Gale foused on how the New York Times(NYT) has branded itself as a publication that experiments with many types of fonts. NYT can play around with different types and massive fonts as illustration. If someone picks up a page from the floor, they can usually tell that it’s from the New York Times because of branding.

5. Picking fonts is like eating ice cream. (Veronika Burian and Jose Scaglione, Type Together)
When combining fonts, look at mechanic and organic feels. Veronika and Jose talked about how people like humanist fonts, with a hint of a calligrapher’s hand. Ideally, you should find a balance typefaces share a common language.